Health

New Bill Hits Parents With $1,000 Fine For Smoking With Children In The Car

Little by little the state and local governments have been doing what they can to eliminate smoking in public, but some think this new bill goes too far.

Science changes over the years, and smoking as a prime example of that. For the longest time it was thought that smoking was actually a good thing. Now, we know better.

This comes from the CDC’s (Center for Disease Control) website:

Secondhand smoke exposure contributes to approximately 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults and 400 deaths in infants each year. Secondhand smoke causes stroke, lung cancer, and coronary heart disease in adults. Children who are exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome, acute respiratory infections, middle ear disease, more severe asthma, respiratory symptoms, and slowed lung growth.

Second hand smoke can also lead to coughing, wheezing, and asthma attacks. Obviously, a child shouldn’t be inhaling smoke. Now, the government wants to punish parents that smoke around their own kids.

As of December 2018, numerous states had laws on the books to deal with smoking while children were inside a vehicle. Those states include California, Louisiana, Arkansas, Maine, Utah, Oregon, Virginia, and Vermont.

Now, add Mike Pence’s home state of Indiana to the mix. The state has just introduced legislation that would impose heavy fines on people that smoke with kids in the car. The first time would lead to a $1,000 penalty. The second would be treated similarly, but on the third stop, the fine bumps up to $10,000.

Lawmakers have noted that the law would be nearly impossible to enforce (then why have it), but it raises awareness on the issue of second hand smoke.

Should other states follow suit?